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5 Seasonal Garnishes for the Ultimate G&T

Take advantage of Britain’s seasonal larder with these fantastic garnishes that will enhance the natural flavours of your favourite gin!

 

1)  Blackberries

You’ll see them ripening amongst almost every British hedgerow in the late summer months, so why not make the most of the sweet flavour of foraged blackberries in your gin? You can simply pop a couple of berries into your glass or smash them to release even more of their fruity juices. It works particularly well when paired with a sprig of fresh rosemary, too.

2) Marsh Samphire

Look out for this tender, salty green – it can be found around salt marshes and tidal mud flats all across the British coast. It has short, stumpy leaves and thick stems, so you’ll need a sharp knife to cut through the plant and take your fill. Give it a good rinse before adding it to your gin and enjoy its distinctive flavour.

3) Foraged Mint

For a fantastic foraging experience go in search of corn mint found in many hedgerows spanning the southern half of the UK. It’s ideal for picking all the way until the end of September. Corn
mint strongly resembles peppermint with its slightly serrated leaves, but the smell will be more subtle. You can also use fresh mint if you haven’t got the time for foraging. Wash the sprigs thoroughly and use them as a decorative topper for cocktails or to add a hit of freshness to your G&T.

4) Chilli

If you’ve been organised enough to grow your own then these spicy peppers will be ripening over August and into September! Alternatively, you’ll be able to find a number of different types of chillies in any good supermarket. Choose wisely, considering how much heat you can handle and you’ll enjoy an invigorating spicy twist to your gin. For a more subtle kick of spice, remove the inner seeds beforehand. It works wonderfully with juniper- lead gins.

6) Elderflower and Elderberries

The delicate white flowers of this plant make a beautiful garnish for any gin-based drink, so pick these while you can! Once their berries come into season you can create even more delicious drink combinations. This plant is incredibly common in the UK – just look out for its vivid green, slightly serrated leaves, clustered pale flowers or deep purple berries. It’s important to remember that elderberries need to be cooked before you eat them, so why not make them into a mouth-watering syrup by reducing them in a saucepan with some water and sugar? A dash of this will create a wonderfully tart and fruity twist to your next gin cocktail – pair this with a shaving of lemon peel to enjoy total refreshment.

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